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Thursday, 22 December 2016 08:15

5 Reasons To Have More Sex

Enough of hushing. It is but necessary that you understand your body and it’s requirements in entirety. How do you expect to be happy and healthy without that knowledge? Let’s talk about sex.

Whatever the reason driving your libido, the benefits of some netflix and chill is universal and surprisingly (or not) so essential. Besides ‘the love hormone’ oxytocin la-di-da (it’s called ‘making love,’ isn’t it?) and enhancing your bond with your partner (let’s just make that very big assumption), let’s see what else a little (or a lot of) action can contribute to your well-being.

1. Sex reduces stress and anxiety.

The hippocampus is the part of your brain responsible for memory, learning, and emotion. Stress is an emotion, which means that your hippocampus must be switched on when your tired soul wishes to combat stress. According to a study, sexual activity stimulates new cell growth in the hippocampus. This empowers your brain (with a truckload of cheerful ammunition) to deal with stress, resulting in a happier, stress-free you.

By increasing the duration of sexual activity, the initial (mild) anxiety that sex brings with it is reduced as well. Another study also implicates the benefits of sex in regulating blood pressure and, hence, stress.

This just means you’ll have a better day at the office, a more-restful sleep at night, and an ‘I don’t care’ attitude when your dog chews the remote control.

 

2. Sex reduces pain.

Intercourse can be fun ,that itself will probably help you forget about that arthritic knee or bruised shoulder. But the analgesic effects of intercourse are much more than just ‘fun.’

If you’ve had a surgery or watched the TV show House, you are well versed with the term morphine. For those of you who aren’t, it is a painkiller. Our bodies endogenously produce morphine-like painkillers called endorphines.

They increase your pain threshold by decreasing your sensitivity to pain. Sexual intercourse increases oxytocin levels (the love hormone) which allows for the release of endorphins. It is probably the body’s way of ensuring that sexual stimulation remains enjoyable and doesn’t become aversive. Well, it’s a win-win for you! More endorphins translates to ‘Pain?

 

3.Sex decreases cardiovascular risks.

A research group proved that the frequency of orgasms is inversely proportional to mortality. Too much to comprehend? A 1,000 middle-aged men were tracked for ten whole years. Those who had more sex led longer lives–a whopping 50% increased mortality. They also had a stronger heart as observed by their reduced risks of coronary diseases.  Sexual activity, thus, protects your cardiovascular health (jump into the sack at least 2 to 3 times a week). It’s all a matter of the heart after all!

4. Sex increases fertility.

For those of you thinking of filling up the soccer team bus with your DNA (read: having babies) 

this is great news. Yes, it is but obvious, the more sex you have, the higher your chances of conception (very basic math). But there is actually more to it than mere probability.

Sperm quality is reduced when its DNA is damaged. According to an Australian study, sex (to the point of ejaculation) every day for a week improved sperm quality by reducing sperm DNA damage. 81% men exhibited a 12% decrease in sperm DNA damage. Less damaged, more robust sperms naturally improve the chances of conception (increased fertility for both the Mr. and the Mrs.). It is, thus, advised that couples trying to have a baby indulge in the good ol’ houghmagandy daily in the week leading up to ovulation.

 

5.Sex boosts immunity.

Immunoglubilin A (IgA) is the most prevalent antibody (read: defence cell) that is produced in mucosal linings throughout our body. More IgA means a stronger immunity. Also, salivary IgA has been proved to be directly proportional to vaginal IgA (Will tell you why this random piece of information in a bit).

According to a study involving 112 college students, individuals who engaged in sexual activity once or twice a week exhibited higher salivary IgA levels than individuals who had no sex or too much sex (more than twice a week).6 Besides an overall strengthened immunity (you’ll fall less sick and can go on those countless dates you have lined up) more salivary IgA means more IgA in the vaginal mucosa as well. This lowers the susceptibility to sexually transmitted diseases. (Now do you see the connection?)

 

 

 

Wednesday, 14 December 2016 07:32

Useful Remedies Hidden In A Tea Bag

After brewing a big cup of tea, the first thing almost all of us do is, a hunt for a trash bin to get rid of that soggy tea bag. “Yeah! a good deed was done”, wrong!
Surprisingly, old tea bags can be used in multiple ways. It is similar to your granny’s advice – might sound weird, but definitely effective when used. They are mentioned below.

1.Revitalises Puffy Tired Eyes

All of us have those nights when we are too engrossed in completing the series, and the result is zombie-like puffy eyes the next day. Tannins in black tea can energise your eyes, and also help in removing that extra baggage under your eyes.
Store used tea bags in an airtight jar, and keep in a fridge. Grab your instant cool “Eye-Lifters” whenever you have those lazy mornings.

2.Fixes Minor Burns

Tannins in tea bags soothe inflammation caused by heat, you can use your refrigerated tea bag to get relief from minor burns as well. It helps in reducing inflammation, and is an effective remedy for minor burns.

3.Treats Sunburn

Do not worry if instead of getting a nice tan on the beach, you sun-burnt your back. A tea bag can be highly effective in getting rid of the itchiness as well as flaky skin. The acid present in black tea possesses soothing properties, that help in getting rid of the excess heat due to sunburn. So, next time pack a tea bag along with your sunscreen while going to the beach.

4.Removes Warts

Get rid of warts by placing a green tea bag on the affected area. You can secure it by wrapping a bandage on top of the tea bag. Antioxidants present in green tea, prevents warts from growing bigger. Replace the old tea bag with a new one after every 15 minutes.

5.Helps Get Rid Of Dandruff

Dandruff is one stubborn issue that almost all of us face at some point in time. If you are done with spending money on expensive products, here is a simple solution – rinse your hair with tea. Steep your favorite tea for an hour before rinsing. A daily scalp massage with tea not only removes dandruff but also adds shine to your hair.

6. Freshens Your Stinky Shoes

Stinky shoes are a matter of deep embarrassment, especially when you are far away from the comfort of your own home. You can freshen your smelly shoes by placing a tea bag in each shoe. It absorbs moisture and wards off the stink.

7.Shoos Off Odour From Hands

Wash your hands with tea bags to get rid of onion and garlic smell. It is effective in getting rid of odours to some extent.

8.Avoids Sore Gums

Spoiler alert – you will end up looking funny! But who cares if it works. Place tea bags in your mouth to reduce swelling and blood clot.

9. Gets Rid Of Watermarks On Mirror

Nobody likes any kind of distraction in the middle of self-admiration, right? Get rid of those water marks on your bathroom mirror by wiping it with a cloth soaked in brewed tea bags. 

10.Helps Cleanse The Dishes

We all understand the struggle of removing grime from the dishes. Here is an easy solution, soak your dirty dishes with tea bags for overnight. You will thank yourself the next day as they are much easier to clean now.

11.Acts As A Manure For Your Garden

Impress your buddies by this impressive re-use of tea bags. Tannins in the tea lower the pH levels of the soil. Lesser the pH level, fewer chances of fungus accumulation at the base of plants. Place the tea bag in the soil around the plant and enjoy the beautiful blossoms.

 

Wednesday, 14 December 2016 06:46

Why Pain Is A Good Thing?

Most of us want to get things done easily without any pain or sorrow. Whenever we hit a stumbling block, we get disappointed and tend to fail in life. But you will succeed if you persevere taking pain in right sense. Pain has its own merits. Once you realize the miraculous change a pain can bring in your life, you will never long for the easy path.

1.Boosts Your Confidence

Success earned the hard way is the sweetest. You tend to measure and value your achievements by the number of obstacles you have to overcome to reach a goal. Pain boosts your confidence for the future and teaches to appreciate your work.

The first visit to a gym is never easy. You have endure pain to build a stronger body. And how satisying it is when you like what you see in the mirror! As you invest more time and pain into achieving a goal, you will feel more committed and driven to do your best.

 

2.Teaches You Life Lessons

Pain is an experience that teaches you how to overcome obstacles in life and move ahead. It equips you to be a better person who does not succumb to tough times. Without having any hurdles to overcome, you will be a man of no experience.

Exam failures, broken relationships, and never-ending job hunts are inevitable experiences that are painful. They may delay our heart’s desires, but in the long run they help us learn to value what really matters. They provide you with ammunition you to face the next challenge. Every failure will, thus, leave a lesson for you and make you stronger.

 

3. Creates Fond Memories

The pain of today may be a cherished memory tomorrow. Recollecting these memories will make you a stronger person and act as a catalyst for all your future ventures. The painstaking effort you put into achieving a goal will always remain a loving memory for you.

This is best explained by the pain a mother undergoes during labor. There will be no difference of opinion among mothers when it comes to the pain associated with childbirth. However, they will also be unanimous in the joy they experienced when they heard their baby’s first cry. It is timeless.

4. Strengthens Your Memory

You can’t help but wish for things to be easier. It is but natural to think that lessons learnt without stress are easier to learn. But you are wrong. Researchers at Princeton and Indiana University found that students find it easier to retain ideas that are printed in a font that is difficult to read. The students were forced to concentrate on learning the material, more than usual, which helped them recall it effortlessly much later.

Similarly, lessons learned the hard way are the most remembered. For instance, when your business partnership shatters, you learn what went wrong and won’t repeat your mistake the next time around. Pain is short-lived, but the hard-earned lessons survive a lifetime.

It is impossible to have a pain-free life. Whenever pain comes your way, don’t panic. Embrace it and focus on the takeaway. You will emerge as a changed, more confident individual.

Telecoms remitted a combined sum of Shs4.4b collected from social media tax in the month of July, failing to hit the target of Shs8.3b, according to figures obtained from different government sources.
According to available data, Shs24b, which was collected from mobile money tax in July was in the same measure remitted to Uganda Revenue Authority (URA) on August 15.
Daily Monitor could not independently verify the figures but they were corroborated by different officials in the Finance Ministry and URA, who asked to remain anonymous because they are not authorised to speak for the two institutions.
Last month, Mr David Bahati, the Finance state minister, told journalists that government would collect Shs100b from the social media tax also known as over the top tax.
However, data indicates that only Shs4.4b was collected against an average target of Shs8.3b.
Government intends to collect about Shs100b in this financial year from social media tax, which means that URA has a target of at least Shs8.3b every month.
Mr Hudson Kalema, the URA acting commissioner for public and corporate affairs, could not confirm the figure, saying: “I have to work through a process to get you accurate information ... that would need a minimum of 48 hours,” he said.
In a letter written to Finance minister in March, President Museveni had projected that government would at least collect Shs400b alone from social media users, reasoning that is would be another way to widen the tax base.
However, this figure was later revised to Shs100b.
The social media tax has faced a lot of resistance with many users opting to maneuver around the tax by using virtual private networks (VPN) to access blocked social media sites.
In an interview recently, Mr Abdusalam Waiswa, the Uganda Communications Commission director for legal affairs, told Daily Monitor they were working on blocking VPN access but were challenged by recurring creations of multiple access points from unknown destination.
“It has been a challenge because of the creation of multiple VPN [access points] and the difference in jurisdiction,” he said.
The two collections from social media and mobile money tax were remitted on August 15, as stipulated by the tax law.
The social media tax was one of the new taxes that were introduced in the 2018/19 financial year after the amendment of the Excise Duty law.
The law also introduced a 1 per cent charge on all mobile money transactions, which raised a lot of debate.
The charge has since been recalled and is currently undergoing a review in Parliament.
President Museveni has since said that there was an error as Cabinet had only agreed on 0.5 per cent and not 1 per cent.
Mr Val Oketcho, the MTN corporate communications manager and Ms Sumin Namaganda, the Airtel public relations manager, declined to comment on the figures, citing client confidentiality.

 

Credit: Daily Monitor

Zimbabwe's top court on Friday dismissed an opposition bid to have presidential election results annulled over alleged rigging in favour of Robert Mugabe's successor, Emmerson Mnangagwa.

"In the final analysis, the court finds the applicant has failed to place before it clear, direct, sufficient and credible evidence" of irregularities, said Chief Justice Luke Malaba in his ruling at the Constitutional Court in Harare.

"Emmerson Dambudzo Mnangagwa is duly declared winner of presidential elections held on the 30th of July 2018."

Analysts had widely predicted the court would rule against the opposition MDC party's case.

Malaba dismissed the application with costs after strongly criticising the legal challenge.

Lawyers for the Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) opposition had argued that the results should be annulled due to alleged "massive doctoring" of the vote.

 

Credit: The East African

Gen Kale Kayihura, the former Inspector General of Police, who has been in military detention has Friday been charged in the General Court Martial sitting at Makindye with three counts.

Gen Andrew Gutti, the chairman of the court, presided over the proceedings.
Gen Kayihura was charged with aiding and abetting the kidnapping by commission, repatriating Rwandan exile and refugees and Ugandan citizens to Rwanda between 2012 and 2016.

He was also accused of failing to protect war material by issuing arms to unauthorised persons including Boda Boda 2010 members led by jailed Abdallah Kitatta between 2010 and 2018.

Gen Kayihura denied the charges.

His lawyers, who wanted their client to be released on bail were asked to put their application in writing for consideration on August 28.
The case was adjourned to September 4, 2018.

Since June 13, Gen Kayihura has been confined to a two-bedroom apartment house in the Military Police Barracks at Makindye, a suburb of Kampala City.

During his tenure as police chief, the number of police officers rose from 15,000 to 50,000. He made stopping Dr Besigye’s quest for power his pet project, breaking up the gatherings of the Opposition chief and overseeing his arrest several times.

Towards the end of his tenure, the police office seemed to go a bit out of control, with President Yoweri Museveni accusing the Force of being infiltrated by criminals and eventually ordering the army to arrest a number of senior police officers and other Gen Kayihura’s associates, which ended with the arrest of Gen Kayihura himself.

By that time, crime seemed to spiral around the country, with killings, including of high profile citizens, and robberies being rampant.

Friday, 24 August 2018 06:00

Children still face sexual violence

Back in 2012, Daily Monitor published a traumatising story of Joan (not real name) narrating how her own father had repeatedly raped her on a number of occasions.
As a result, the young girl sustained injuries to her private parts which oozed blood and pus.
To date, the girl continues to suffer psychological distress from the ordeal.
Joan is among many girls whose stories have been highlighted in the different media platforms as a way of raising awareness about the vice.
Sexual violence encompasses sexual abuse and exploitation of children including forced sex, erotic touches such as grabbing or fondling of the child. Sexual violence also includes harassment, threats and tricks directed towards a child in exchange for sex.

The statistics
Uganda Violence Against Children survey report findings released on August 2018 show that one in three young women have experienced sexual abuse during their childhood.
Also, one in four young adults who experienced sexual abuse in their childhood had their first abuse experience at 13 or at a much younger age.
Further, the report highlights that most frequent perpetrators of sexual violence against girls during their childhoods were neighbours and strangers. These girls, aged 13 to 17 years, most frequently experienced sexual violence on the road, their own respective homes and school.
Meanwhile, boys aged 13 to 24 years reported friends, classmates, and neighbours as the most frequent perpetrators of sexual violence. They were abused in the evening, and most commonly at school, in their homes, and on the road.

Consequences of sexual violence
Children who suffer sexual abuse get affected in different ways.
They may get mental disorder as a result of recurrent sexual episodes playing in their minds, says Ian Musoke, a child welfare social worker.
“For example, if a girl was raped, there is a likelihood that she will keep thinking of what happened to her, and, in the long run, this may cause her mental agony,” Musoke says.
Rape also comes with the high risk of exposure to HIV/Aids and other sexually transmitted diseases including gonorrhea and syphilis. Some girls also get pregnant in the process.
“Sadly, because some of these girls conceive at a time they are still very young, they end up losing their life as well as that of the baby,” Musoke says.
Then, some of these victims may either resort to run away from home or committing suicide out of shame.
Musoke says sometimes these victims can end up detesting men or relationships.
A case in point, Namayanja, now aged 25 years, says she starting hating men after being raped by her uncle at the age of 10 years.
“I don’t like the idea of any man touching me as it always reminds me of my painful past,” Namayanja says.
Although a number of suitors continue to propose marriage, Namayanja continuously says she is not yet ready to settle down. Uganda is a signatory to a number of international instruments including the United Nations (UN) Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), article 19, which requires that children are protected from all forms of violence (including sexual abuse).
However, a Ministry of education and sports report issued in 2014 titled Response, Tracking, Referral, and Response (RTRR), guidelines on violence against children in schools, noted there were existing challenges towards reporting cases of abuse.

Credit: Daily Monitor

Tuesday, 17 October 2017 06:00

Museveni’s long march in power

As the debate on Raphael Magyezi’s bill to amend Article 102(b) rages, BAKER BATTE LULE looks back at the journey President Museveni has walked to where he is now.

Some pundits refer to his 31 years in power as a life presidency project. That from the outset, Museveni was never going to let go of the presidency.

The carrot and stick have been applied at different points to overcome obstacles to this alleged project.

We start with the first four years after the NRM/A shot its way into office in 1986 when the new government issued Legal Notice No. 1. The notice decreed that the interim government would be in place for only four years, following which a general election would be called in 1989.

However, in the same year, President Museveni, who was the chairman of the NRA [now UPDF] and National Resistance Council [now parliament], shifted.

He told his then minister of Justice and attorney general, George Wilson Kanyeihamba, to draft justifications for the extension of the NRC and its executive arm for another five years until a new constitution under which general elections would be held had been written.

Kanyeihamba, now a retired Supreme court judge, told The Observer recently that there were justifiable reasons for the extension of Museveni’s tenure then. But these reasons no longer exist today, Kanyeihamba says.

“When the Movement came, they had given themselves four years but that was idealistic. Museveni entrusted me to articulate the views why the NRM should extend for another five years. I did; you don’t have to believe my word, go to the NRM secretariat [and check what I said],” Kanyeihamba said.

Today, the retired judge finds himself vehemently opposed to his former boss’ determination to lift age limits from the constitution and remove the last thing standing in the way of a potential presidency for life. Kanyeihamba says the issues which necessitated extending Museveni’s tenure 28 years ago have long disappeared.

“For the president who has served the country for over 30 years making decisions day and night; he is physically and mentally exhausted...,” he said.

In the then expanded National Resistance Council of 270 members, only one member, Joseph Wasswa Ziritwawula opposed the 1989 extension. He famously walked out, resigning his seat as NRC member representing a Kampala constituency.

Ziritwawula has long retreated from active politics. However, in an interview with a local daily, the former Kampala mayoral candidate said he would still resign if the same situation played out now.

“Proclamation No. 1 of 1986, put it that the government would be in power for four years after which they would hold elections. Which they didn’t do,” Ziritwawula said.

“I was saying that parliament (NRC) could not extend its term. It is like parliament sitting today and deciding to extend its term. That is not its mandate; it’s the mandate of the people. Giving a period for government is a mandate of the whole population; not a mandate of parliament,” he said.

LIFTING OF TERM LIMITS

The NRC later approved the Uganda Constitutional Commission headed by former Chief Justice Benjamin Odoki to collect people’s views about the new constitution which was debated and promulgated by the Constituent Assembly in 1995. In there, it had article 105 (b) limiting a person eligible for election as president to two five-year terms.

In the subsequent elections of 1996, a still popular President Museveni defeated his closest rival, the opposition coalition candidate, Paul Kawanga Ssemogerere by 75 percent.

Five years on in 2001, he returned to the people with an election manifesto built around the need to professionalise the armed forces ahead of the transition to full civilian rule.

Credit: The Observer Newspaper.

 

East African Community, Kampala, Uganda, 28 October, 2016: The  second  EAC Common Market Scorecard (CMS) 2016  which evaluates implementation of the EAC Common Market Protocol was  launched  in  Kampala, Uganda by the EAC Deputy Secretary  General  in charge of Finance and Administration, Hon. Jesca Eriyo. The Scorecard 2016, which measures Partner States' compliance to the free movement of capital, services, and goods, was developed by the World Bank Group together with Trade Mark East Africa at the request of the EAC Secretariat.


The Scorecard was developed over a period of 18 months under the supervision of the EAC Secretariat and Partner States. The areas of capital, services and goods were selected for scoping as they are fundamental to the operations of the Common Market.

Addressing the participants at the launching, the EAC Deputy Secretary General stated that "a number of reforms have been undertaken since the 2014 CMS.  These have brought the total number of non-conforming measures (NCMs) down from 63 in 2014 to 59 in 2016.'' While this shows progress it should be noted that all EAC Partner States remain largely non-compliant in their services trade liberalization commitments, added Hon. Jesca Eriyo.

Hon Eriyo disclosed to the participants that In CMS 2016 all Partner States were given full marks for compliance. Subsequent scorecards should consider assessing implementation of these commitments.The Deputy Secretary General informed the participants that the Scorecard is well aligned with the EAC's implementation priorities. "It fosters peer learning and facilitate the adoption of best practice in the region".

"The Scorecard will contribute to strengthen the regional market, grow the private sector and deliver benefits to consumers," stated Hon. Eriyo.


She said the implementation in terms of recognition of certificates of origin, an issue repeatedly identified as a significant non-tariff barrier (NTB) in 2014, Burundi continues to earn full points and Kenya continues to score 90 percent.  Tanzania's recognition of certificates of origin has improved from 50 to 60 percent; Rwanda and Uganda's scores have both declined, indicating a worsening performance in terms of recognizing certificates of origin of other EAC Partner States. Most countries improved their score on applying tariff equivalent charges, though such charges persist as barriers to intra-EAC trade, stated the EAC official.

Hon Jesca Eriyo disclosed to the participants that the EAC average of resolution of new NTBs for the 2016 period was about 54 percent, better than the 38 percent rate for CMS 2014. The EAC Deputy Secretary General called for greater information sharing regarding the Treaty and Protocol provisions in the Partner States. Some members of the private sector, including private sector apex bodies, were unfamiliar with the Protocol or with the commitments affecting their operations. Hon Eriyo urged Partner States to strongly engage and inform the private sector on the implications on these reforms on their day-to-day operations across the region and develop a private sector reform champions who could help push for implementation.

Catherine Masinde, the Practice Manager, East Africa, Trade and Competitiveness, World Bank Group, said, EAC Partners have done a commendable effort in removing barriers to free movement of capital, services and goods, but more needs to be done

She said the EAC Scorecard provides transparent, rigorous, unbiased and client-led data on the key implementation gaps to the integration of the region's economies. It also highlights possible reform areas to improve compliance to the Common Market Protocol".

On his  part Vice Chairman of East African Business Council Uganda, Kassim Omary, said it is of atmost importance to measure the extent to which the EAC Parter States are translating the Common Market Protocol into policies that support actualization of free movement of people and workers, goods, services and the rights of establishment and residence within the EAC Partner States

Mr Richard Kamajugo, Senior Director of Trade Mark East Africa in-charge  of Trade  and Environment,  said that  the TMEA Program of support to the Common Market Scorecard has been running from 2012 to march 2017,under the EAC Investment Climate Programe. He said the total budget support to the program was $ 10.4m,  through IFC and EAC (technical support), under a 5 component program aimed at increasing  inter and intra-regional trade and investment  through investment climate reforms supporting the EAC Common Market.

 

East African Court of Justice, Arusha, 31st October, 2016: The Judge President of the East African Court of Justice (EACJ), Hon. Justice Dr. Emmanuel Ugirashebuja, has on behalf of the Court congratulated Hon. Justice Isaac Lenaola upon his new appointment as a judge of the Supreme Court of the Republic of Kenya.

Justice Lenaola who has been a Judge at the High Court of Kenya been promoted to the Supreme Court of Kenya after a rigorous recruitment process. His Lordship has replaced retired Justice Philip Tunoi, former Vice President of the EACJ. Until his appointment, Justice Lenaola was the head of the Constitutional and Human Rights Division at the High Court of Kenya.

The Summit of the EAC Heads of State appointed His Lordship Justice Lenaola as a Judge of the EACJ, First Instance Division, in April 2011 and consequently designated him as the Deputy Principal Judge of the same Division in November 2013, a position he still holds to date. Justice Lenaola replaced retired Hon. Lady Justice Mary Stella Arach Amoko from the Republic of Uganda with effect from 1st December, 2013.  

The President of the Court, Hon. Justice Dr. Ugirashebuja hailed Justice Lenaola upon his new appointment and wishes him success in his new role as a Supreme Court judge.

Hon. Justice Dr. Ugirashebuja said that Justice Lenaola's elevation from the High Court to the Supreme Court demonstrates the judge's industriousness and commitment to serve, thus his being entrusted with a greater assignment.   

 

His Excellency, President Uhuru Kenyatta swore in Justice Lenaola as a Judge of the Supreme Court on 28th October, 2016. Also sworn in at the same ceremony was Justice Philomena Mwilu as the Deputy Chief Justice of the Republic of Kenya.

 

 

About the EACJ

 

The East African Court of Justice (EACJ or 'the Court'), is one of the Organs of the East African Community established under Article 9 of the Treaty for the Establishment of the East African Community. Established in November 2001, the Court's major responsibility is to ensure the adherence to law in the interpretation and application of and compliance with the EAC Treaty.

 

Arusha is the temporary seat of the Court until the Summit determines its permanent seat. The Court's sub-registries are located in the respective National Courts in the Partner States.

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