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Government is effective July 1 set to elevate Fort Portal, Mbarara, Hoima, Lira, Arua, Gulu, Mbale, Jinja and Entebbe municipalities to cities, supposedly to promote regional development.
The Vision 2040 recommendation to create the new cities is to decongest Kampala, the commissioner in-charge of Urban Planning, Mr Justin Niwagaba, said last week.

According to the Local Government Act, a municipality must have a population of at least 500,000, have facilities, institutions, developments and an enabling environment that attract people to work, invest and stay there.
The private sector must also offer services to support the growing city and its population, among others.
According to Mr Niwagaba, Arua, Mbarara, Gulu and Mbale will be regional cities while others will be strategic cities; Fort Portal (tourism), Jinja (industrial), Lira (industrial) and Hoima (oil).
Nakasongola and Moroto have been differed because their planning requires a different model where basic amenities must be put in place in order to attract dwellers.

Fort Portal tourism city
A fortnight ago, Kabarole District Council approved the proposed Fort Portal tourism city after resolving to annex other lower administrative units as it gears up for the long awaited city status.
Parts of the district annexed to the proposed tourism city include Karago Town Council and Ibaale Parish from Busoro and Karambi sub-counties.

Others include Kiko, Mugusu and Kasenda town councils and Kasenda, Ruteete, Mugusu and Karagura sub-counties. These are endowed with tourism sites such as crater lakes.
The proposed city will have two divisions; one will cover the present East and South divisions, Ibaale Parish, Rubigo Parish and Karambi Sub-county, while the other will cover the present West Division, Karago Town Council, Bukuuku Sub-county and Butebe Parish.
Currently, Fort Portal has West, East and South divisions, covering about 40 square kilometers against the required 120 square kilometers, according to the mayor, the Rev Kintu Muhanga. The 2014 national census put the town population at 54,275.

The urban authority in 2016 launched a campaign of planting one million trees with the aim of creating a forest city by 2025.

 

Credit: Daily Monitor

Published in Ayurveda

 

President Museveni has broken his silence on Mr Tribert Rujugiro Ayabatwa, the businessman at the heart of Rwanda-Uganda stand-off.
In a letter published by the New Vision, a government owned newspaper, on Tuesday, President Museveni on March 10, 2019 wrote to his Rwandan counterpart Paul Kagame explaining circumstances under which he met the businessman and other Rwandans the Kigali government declared as rebels.

Rwanda has accused the Ugandan government of harbouring and supporting its dissidents under their umbrella Rwanda National Congress (RNC) and torturing its citizens among others.
However, Mr Museveni, in the said letter states that he refused to support Rwandan dissidents because the issues they were raising are an “internal matter of Rwanda” and that it is against the stand of the African Union for one country to interfere in the internal affairs of sister countries.

According to the President, Ms Charlotte Mukankusi approached him accusing the Kagame government of killing her husband before she asked him (Museveni) for support.
“I told her that we could not support them because what was happening in Rwanda was an internal matter of Rwanda. I explained to her that the stand of the African Union is a scientific one and it is correct. Interfering in the internal affairs of sister countries is wrong because, first of all, outsiders cannot understand situations of sister countries well. They can make mistakes. Secondly, those mutual interferences in one another’s internal affairs will interfere with the bigger normal, non-controversial, State to State activities — trade, transport, etc,” he said.

 

Below is Museveni’s full letter as published in the New Vision

Your Excellency Paul Kagame,

Greetings from the people of Uganda and from myself. I am writing to let you know that by accident, I, at last, had a meeting with a Rwandan who admitted to being a member of the group you told me about — Rwanda National Congress (RNC). This is a lady known as Mukankusi, whom, I am sure you know, but I had never met before.

One of my National Resistance Movement (NRM) contacts kept telling me that there was a Rwandan lady who had some important information to give me and that she wanted to come with somebody known as Gasana, who also had important information.

When I heard of Gasana, I thought that it was the Gasana who was behind me at Ntare and who, for a long time, had worked in the foreign affairs ministry of Uganda. When they came a few days ago, I discovered that Gasana was a completely different person. I think I had seen this gentleman once when the delegation of the Security Council had visited Uganda some years ago.

I then asked them what they wanted to tell me. Mukankusi told me that her husband, Rutagarama, had been killed by the agents of the Rwanda State. She mentioned Nziiza, Munyuza, etc. How had she confirmed this? That she had been told by those very people. I then asked her what she wanted me to do about it because this is an internal matter of Rwanda.

She said she wanted me to know bad things that were happening in Rwanda. She further told me that she had joined the RNC to resist Your Excellency’s Government and she wanted us to support them.

I told her that we could not support them because what was happening in Rwanda was an internal matter of Rwanda. I explained to her that the stand of the African Union is a scientific one and it is correct. Interfering in the internal affairs of sister countries is wrong because, first of all, outsiders cannot understand situations of sister countries well.

They can make mistakes. Secondly, those mutual interferences in one another’s internal affairs will interfere with the bigger normal, non-controversial, State to State activities — trade, transport, etc.

It is, therefore, correct to only concentrate on bilateral or multilateral issues and never involve oneself in the internal affairs of other countries. She was disappointed with my reply and I told her that I will inform you in writing.

Gasana, on the other hand, said that he was not involved with the RNC, but that he came to help a white lady, Wolfson, who we had declared persona-non-grata, to come back and continue with her charity work.

Some of our (people in the) diaspora had worked on it with him. He told me that he works with the Jewish Agency and, apparently, they are the ones who support Wolfson.

Mr. Rujugiro also came, separately. He seems to be resisting the idea of selling his businesses, which he had accepted (to do) before. He countered the idea of giving money to Kayumba by saying that even if he sells the factories in Uganda, he still has more lucrative factories in Angola, DR Congo, etc., a total of eight of them. He can send money from those.

He denied sending money to Kayumba or being a politician. He said that he had only supported RPF at the late Rwigyema’s request and your request.

If, therefore, he is still a problem to Rwanda, the correct option is to use the Courts of Uganda to prove the case of terrorism and then his assets can be frozen. You did not respond to my letter of October 15, 2018, which contained that proposal.

All these people left Uganda after only a few days. This was to inform you of these encounters. As I told you when we met, there is no question of Uganda supporting anti-Rwanda elements.

Indeed, I have not heard Rwanda saying that Uganda “supports” these elements. What I heard and what you told me when we met was that some of these elements were “operating” from or “in’’ Uganda to recruit, etc. It is this aspect that the joint teams should work on.

I invited Ambassador Mugambagye and I linked him with our people and the Minister of Foreign Affairs. This is easy to follow up. What is wrong is for Rwanda agents to try to operate behind the Government of Uganda. I get a lot of stories; but I will never raise them unless I have confirmed them.

Yoweri Kaguta Museveni President of the Republic of Uganda March 10, 2019

  

Soruce: Daily Monitor
Published in Politics
 KAMPALA. A 25-year-old man was Wednesday convicted for insulting his mother by calling her several obscene names after she cautioned him against excessive drinking.

Mr Douglas Ojok aka Erick Odong, also threatened to kill his mother, Mary Akello, 50, on March 29 at their home in Kyebando-Kisalosalo, a Kampala suburb.

Mr Ojok pleaded guilty before City Hall Court Magistrate, Ms Beatrice Khainza. He was charged with two counts of threatening violence and insulting the modesty of a woman.
Court adjourned the case to April 9 for sentencing.
Mr Ojok and his mother had been living together, but on the day of the incident, the former returned home late drunk. 
His mother then interrogated him on why he was overdrinking instead of looking for a job.

Ojok started insulting his mother calling her a prostitute and hurling other insults. He later entered the house and picked a knife and threatened to stab her unless she left the home.
The mother reported the matter to police and Ojok was arrested.

 

 Source: Daily Monitor

Published in Media

A statutory internal audit report for the second quarter of Financial Year 2018/2019 has unearthed rot in the Kampala Capital City Authority (KCCA)’s procurement process.
The report, published on January 31, was compiled by KCCA director of internal audit Moses Canon Bwire basing on the period between October and December last year. Mr Bwire’s report was backed by reviewing the contracts signed between July 10, 2016, and June 30, 2018.
The objective of the audit was to establish whether the procurement, management and payment for the city works were in line with government procedures and guidelines.

The audit findings indicate failure to submit performance securities by some contractors, inadequate usage of the existing contracts management system, calling off orders issued to contractors with higher unit prices under frame contracts and failure to prepare management plans for some contracts.

Others are failure to provide for retention during the defects liability period, delays in payment for certified works, payment of value added tax components to unregistered contractors and unclear land boundaries affecting project implementation.
The internal audit director is mandated by Section 60 of the KCCA Act to prepare quarterly audit reports and submit them to the authority and give a copy to the authority’s public accounts committee.

Performance securities
Section12(1,3,4) of the Public Procurement and Disposal of Public Assets (PPDA) regulations, 2014 states that a performance security shall be required to protect the procuring and disposing entity against non-performance of a contract. According to the PPDA regulations, the performance security shall be equivalent to 10 per cent of the value of a call-off order.

However, the audit shows that although KCCA signed contracts for road repairs with five contractors with a provision for a 10 per cent performance security of the contract price, two providers did not submit performance securities. 
“…KCCA is not protected if the contractor fails to execute some of the contract obligations,” Mr Bwire warned.
According to the audit, KCCA’s department of Information Technology developed a contract management system to aid in monitoring contract implementation phases from inception up to completion.
But findings show that there were no updates by contract managers and other key stakeholders during the contract implementation and payment process.

Mr Bwire noted that such glaring irregularities undermine the purpose for creation of the contracts management system since it is difficult to monitor the performance of contractors.
KCCA as a contract manager is mandated by Section 51(3) of the PPDA (contracts) regulations, 2014 to prepare a contract management plan and forward a copy to the procurement and disposal unit for purposes of monitoring.

Contract monitoring
However, the audit reveals that there are instances where there was neither evidence on the contract management file nor the procurement file that KCCA prepared contracts management plans for the contracts reviewed.
Contracts where management plans were not prepared include emergency roof repairs, ceiling boards, electrical fittings and rainwater harvesting at Kololo Primary School, and construction of a classroom block at Kansanga Seed Secondary School.
Others are construction of a piggery unit and a chicken house at Kyanja Agriculture Resource Centre, and construction of a wall fence at Kisaasi Primary School.

“…failure to prepare contract management inhibits project monitoring by other stakeholders due to absence of the planned workflow information,” the audit states. Mr Bwire recommends that in future, the KCCA head of procurement should ensure that all contract managers prepare and submit contract management plans to ease monitoring of contract deliverables by various stakeholders.
According to the audit, KCCA entered into a framework contract for the routine road repairs with five service providers who were required to provide the said works and related services for a period of 18 months at different unit prices. The procurement guidelines require KCCA to issue a call-off order to the provider for only items with the lowest price where the framework agreement has been entered into with several providers for several items at different prices.

However, the audit shows that in several cases, the call-off orders were issued to providers with higher prices without evidence that they would offer the same services at a cheaper cost under the same contract framework. 
Mr Bwire recommended that where framework contracts are entered into with more than one service provider, the issuance of call-off orders must always be done after analysing the prices to ensure that priority is given to the eligible providers who offer the services at the least cost to reduce unnecessary expenditures.

KCCA speaks out
In an email to this newspaper last week, KCCA spokesperson Peter Kaujju acknowledged the audit queries but noted that the report is intended to ensure system improvements at the authority.
“… as an institution, we pay high attention to the government procurement procedures and this explains our top ranking among government entities over the years. Last year, KCCA was ranked at 83 per cent in terms of performance,” the email reads in part.

“We have done well and will continue to observe the recommended procurement procedure in all our areas of business including contracting, management and across the entire procurement cycle,” Mr Kaujju added.
However, he did not explain how KCCA intends to recover the money which was lost as a result of irregularities in the procurement process.
But in a telephone interview yesterday, Kampala Lord Mayor Erias Lukwago noted that while the current 2010 KCCA Act requires the contracts committee to submit quarterly reports of procurement to the authority, the committee has never submitted any report since KCCA came into being in 2011.

Mr Lukwago further noted that the composition of the contracts committee members is not clear.
“Whenever we ask for the reports, they accuse us of interfering with the work of the executive director yet we are doing our supervisory role as an authority. However, we have made it clear that the law cannot be compromised hence we need compliance,” he said.
Section 66 of the 2010 KCCA Act states that the capital city contracts committee shall give to the authority a copy of the published quarterly summary reports of the procurements and disposals made by it during the quarter concerned containing such particulars.

Recent case

Different view. In February, a KCCA public accounts committee report highlighted irregularities in the management of city properties. Failure to appoint contract managers, the report said, brought up lapses in the contracts management resulting in loss of revenue. The report states that absence of a contract manager to follow up on the execution of the lease that was granted to Formar Ltd for Plot 9B Kira Road, led to encroachment on the children’s park (Plot 9A) without KCCA’s notice.

Credit: Daily Monitor

Published in Media

Suspected kidnappers of US tourist Kimbley Sue Endicott have been arrested. Endicott and a Ugandan tour guide Jean Paul Mirenge Remezo were kidnapped by four gunmen, who hijacked their safari vehicle from Queen Elizabeth National Park on April 2.

The gunmen had demanded a ransom of $500,000 (about Shs1.8b) using Ms Sue and Mirenge’s cell phones. 
Police said the two were rescued from the Democratic Republic of Congo by a joint effort involving the Uganda police force, Uganda Peoples Defence Forces (UPDF) and sister security agencies. 
Reports indicate that the US military also provided support to Ugandan security forces to accomplish the mission. The support included intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance assets and liaison officers, according to US news outlets.

Ms Sue was handed over to the US Embassy in Kampala by Inspector General of Police Martin Okoth Ochola on Monday.

Two of the four gunmen have reportedly been apprehended. The two were only identified as Hakim and Kwarishiima. Sources said the suspects were flown from Kanungu District in western Uganda where they were tracked using a device which was placed in the ransom money they received before setting Ms Sue and Mirenge free.

"The joint security team actively investigating the kidnapping incident and successful recovery of an American tourist Ms. Kimberly Sue Endicott and a Senior Tour Guide, Jean Paul Mirenge- Remezo, has made some arrests of suspects, on suspicion of being involved in their kidnap," police tweeted on Tuesday.

Police spokesperson Fred Enanga confirmed to URN that there were some arrests made in regard to the kidnap. He, however, declined to divulge details. 
"I can confirm that there were some arrests but I am yet to get details. I will brief you when I get the information," Enanga said.

US President Donald Trump on Monday tasked the Ugandan government to hunt the kidnappers and bring them to book.

“Uganda must find the kidnappers of the American tourist and guide before people will feel safe in going there. Bring them to justice openly and quickly,” President Trump tweeted. 
The kidnap cast a shadow on Queen Elizabeth National Park, one of the most visited tourist attractions which is home to lions, hippos, crocodiles and various types of antelopes.

Credit: Daily Monitor Uganda

Published in Shout
Wednesday, 29 October 2014 00:00

EALA SET TO REVIEW RULES OF PROCEDURE TOMORROW

East African Legislative Assembly, Kigali, October 28, 2014: EALA is set to commence review of the Rules of Procedure tomorrow, the Speaker, Rt. Hon Margaret Nantongo Zziwa has ruled this afternoon.

 The ruling followed a Motion introduced by Hon Judith Pareno seeking to adjourn other business in the House until the review/amendment of the said Rules of Procedures are debated on as a matter of priority.

 According to the mover of the Bill, Article 60 of the Treaty stipulates that the Assembly may make, amend, add to or revoke to the rules governing the Assembly. The motion, which was seconded by Hon Nancy Abisai further avers that the term of Commissioners of EALA ends on December 5, 2014 and that their election is neither provided for in the Administration of EALA Act nor in the Rules of Procedure.

 The debate on amendments was interrupted on the 26th March 2014.  Today, Hon Pareno moved that the debate resumes immediately and that it should be placed on the Order Paper as the 1st item on the agenda of the next business of the House.

 Article 49 (2) of the Treaty for the Establishment of the East African Community provides that the Assembly shall make its Rules of Procedure and those of the Committees.

 The move was preceded by a Motion moved by Hon Mike Sebalu that the East African Community Co-operative Societies Bill, 2014 be read for the second time. The object of Bill is to provide a legal framework for Co-operative Societies in line with Article 128 of the Treaty for the Establishment of the EAC strengthening the role of private sector as an effective force for developing economies. 

The Bill is divided into ten parts. Part 1 deals with preliminary matters which according to Hon Sebalu, lay down objectives of Co-operative Societies which include: solving problems collectively, co-ordinating knowledge and skills and promoting self-reliance amongst Members. 

 The rest of the areas contained in the Bill deal with the formation, rights and duties of Members and Privileges. The Bill further contains clauses whose content include the assets and liabilities, settlement of disputes and winding up/dissolution of Societies.

 

Published in Opinion
Friday, 27 June 2014 00:00

On trail of dangerous rebel mission

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Published in Soccer

Algerian lawmakers appointed a regime stalwart as the country's first new president in two decades Tuesday, dismaying protesters seeking sweeping change following the resignation of veteran leader Abdelaziz Bouteflika. 
The election of upper house speaker Abdelkader Bensalah as interim president follows constitutional rules but goes against the demands of demonstrators, who have pushed for him and other top politicians to stand down.

"I want to work towards fulfilling the interests of the people," Bensalah, a trusted ally of Bouteflika, told parliament on taking up the 90-day interim presidency.
"It's a great responsibility that the constitution demands of me," the 77-year-old added.

Opposition parties refused to back the appointment of the seasoned establishment insider and boycotted the session, as thousands of students protested against him in Algiers.
"Resign Bensalah!" they chanted, clutching hand-written placards and Algerian flags.
For the first time in seven weeks police in the capital fired tear gas to try to disperse the protest by students, who were also hit with water cannon.

On Friday -- in the first weekly mass protest since Bouteflika announced his departure after losing the military's support -- Algerians demanded regime insiders be excluded from the political transition.
Ahead of the parliamentary session, an editorial in pro-government daily El Moudjahid on Tuesday suggested Bensalah should step aside from the presidential post.
He is "not tolerated by the citizen movement, which demands his immediate departure," or by the opposition and various political groups in both houses of parliament, the newspaper said.

- 'Voice of the people' -
Three men in particular have drawn demonstrators' ire: Bensalah, the head of the constitutional council Tayeb Belaiz and prime minister Noureddine Bedoui.
The protest movement is calling for a new transitional framework that is committed to deep reforms and organising free elections.
Ahead of Bensalah's appointment, calls continued for the speaker to step down.
"He has to resign, it's the voice of the people and the people must be right," said 50-year-old Mourad, an entrepreneur who will protest Friday with his two young daughters.
"They don't know that there's democracy... I want to teach them what freedom is," he added.

Algerians of all ages have rallied since late February against Bouteflika, who resigned a week ago after efforts to appease demonstrators proved fruitless.
Although the 82-year-old's resignation was celebrated by protesters, they have remained firm in pushing for a wider overhaul of the political system.

Human Rights Watch said Bouteflika's departure is "at most a first step in ending autocratic rule."
"During any transitional phase, authorities should fully respect the rights of Algerians to speak, assemble and associate with one another," the watchdog said in a statement.
Demonstrators in huge numbers have defied a protest ban in Algiers, and HRW on Tuesday called on authorities to overhaul laws "on association and assembly that stifle rights."

 Source: Daily Monitor
 
Published in Politics
Sunday, 02 November 2014 00:00

HOUSE ADJOURNED INDEFINITELY

East African Legislative Assembly, Kigali, October 30, 2014: EALA has this morning adjourned sine die (indefinitely) on the last day of business owing to a quorum hitch.

 The Rules of Procedure (Rule 13) provide that the quorum of the House shall consist of half of the elected Members provided that such quorum shall be composed of at least three of the elected nine Members from each Partner State.

 Only two Members of the Assembly from the United Republic of Tanzania were present in the House this morning.  Kenya had 8 Members, Burundi 8 Members, Uganda 7 Members and Rwanda 9 Members, during the roll call by the Speaker.

 Hon Susan Nakawuki brought the matter of objection to quorum to the notice of the Speaker, who suspended the House for 15 minutes in accordance with the Rules. Upon resumption, the numbers remained the same.

 As at the time of interruption, the Motion moved by Hon Dora Byamukama on Wednesday, October 29th, 2014, to remove Hon Shy-Rose Bhanji as a Member of the EALA Commission (EALA's policy organ) by way of secret ballot was on the Order Paper.  Under the Rules of Procedure (Rule 18) any item of business standing on the Order Paper as at time of interruption shall be placed on the Order Paper for the next Sitting.

 The Motion moved under Article 31 (l) avers that the Member had exhibited misconduct while on an EU Benchmarking trip to Brussels, Belgium on October 7-11th, 2014 and attended by Members of the Commission and Chairpersons of EALA's Committees.

 According to the Motion, the Member in question made derogatory remarks about some EAC Partner States, some Members of the Summit of EAC States and verbally insulted Members of the delegation.  

 The Resolution condemns and expresses displeasure in the mis-conduct of the Honorable Shyrose Bhanji.  

 The Motion was supported by Hon Abubakar Zein, Hon Christophe Bazivamo, Hon Bernard Mulengani and Hon Dr. Martin Nduwimana.  Others were Hon Hafsa Mossi, Hon Abdulkarim Harelimana, Hon Peter Mathuki, and Hon Mike Sebalu.

 Those who opposed the Motion were Hon Makongoro Nyerere, Hon Taslima Twaha, Hon Mumbi Ngaru and Hon Susan Nakawuki.

 In her contribution, Hon Shyrose Bhanji denied the allegations terming them as character assassination.  She urged the House that all allegations be put in writing to afford her an opportunity to formally respond.

 The Speaker has also announced in the House of the resignation of 5 Commissioners from the EALA Commission. The Members are Hon Abubakar Ogle (Kenya), Hon Christophe Bazivamo (Rwanda), Hon. Patricia Hajabakiga (Rwanda), Hon Hafsa Mossi (Burundi) and Hon Jeremy Ngendakumana (Burundi)

 This now means that for the Commission to transact any business it needs to be re-constituted according to Article 3 of the Administration of the East African Legislative Assembly Act.

Source: EAC News Press

Published in Video

The Ukraine ceasefire deal agreed on Thursday appears little more than a sticking plaster that will allow Kiev and Ukraine rebels to wind down the fighting but leaves thorny questions on resolving the conflict unanswered, analysts said.

Some 16 hours of talks in the Belarussian capital Minsk -- which saw one reporter collapse with high blood pressure as negotiations continued through Wednesday night -- produced an agreement on a ceasefire to take effect from today and the withdrawal of troops.

The deal -- overseen by president Vladimir Putin and Ukrainian leader Petro Poroshenko -- staves off an immediate threat of Washington beginning to supply weapons to Kiev but is no guarantee that fighting will not resume in the future, analysts said.

The agreement signed by Kiev and rebels left many of the trickiest issues unresolved: the depth of decentralisation, control of the Ukraine-Russia border and the size of the separatist regions to be given autonomy.

“It is unclear how a long-term solution will come out of today’s agreements,” Nikolai Petrov, a professor at the Moscow-based Higher School of Economics, told AFP.

“It is impossible to expect a serious long-term solution to this problem until it becomes clear how the political situation will develop in Kiev and what ties there will be between Russia and the West.”

Petrov compared the deal, agreed with the support of German chancellor Angela Merkel and French president Francois Hollande in Minsk, to an earlier truce accord that was agreed there in September which was widely flouted.

Arming debate in US
The deal at least “reduces the probability of the US and other Western countries supplying Ukraine with defensives weapons,” said chief economist Holger Schmieding of German bank Berenberg.
Observers have warned that if Washington gets involved militarily, a regional conflict that has claimed more than 5,300 lives could enter a dangerous new stage and become a proxy war between Russia and the West.

But Eugene Rumer, director of the Russia programme at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, said the US debate about arming Kiev was unlikely to die down.

“The voices on the Hill in support of arming Ukraine are likely to grow louder and more assertive if as I fear...this agreement does not deliver on what everybody wants it to deliver on.”
Schmieding said that even if Moscow and rebels honour the agreement, the deal still allows them to overrun the strategic railway hub of Debaltseve. “Russia has the edge on the ground.”

Speaking after the talks, Putin -- who managed to leave without signing anything -- indicated that fighting near Debaltseve was a key sticking point in the negotiations.

The rebels have encircled up to 8,000 Ukrainians troops and expect them to lay down arms, he said. The Ukrainian army denied the claim.
Security analyst Pavel Felgenhauer said both sides could use a breathing space and in any case the fighting on the ground will become difficult during a spring thaw.

“It was impossible for rebels to advance further without Russia sharply ramping up its intervention and the use of aviation,” he told AFP.
“It’s not a good time to fight right now. It’s beginning to thaw.”

“Things will grind to a halt until the summer or later spring when the ground dries out -- then hostilities will resume and intensify.”
Analysts said that upcoming political and economic events both in Russia and Ukraine will serve as a bellwether indicating the conflict’s future direction.

Fragile equilibrium’
“It’s a very fragile equilibrium,” said Petrov. “It depends what happens first -- a large-scale political and economic crisis in Ukraine or whether Russia will weaken under Western sanctions and will face problems at home.”

Source: Daily Monitor

Published in International
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