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Government is effective July 1 set to elevate Fort Portal, Mbarara, Hoima, Lira, Arua, Gulu, Mbale, Jinja and Entebbe municipalities to cities, supposedly to promote regional development.
The Vision 2040 recommendation to create the new cities is to decongest Kampala, the commissioner in-charge of Urban Planning, Mr Justin Niwagaba, said last week.

According to the Local Government Act, a municipality must have a population of at least 500,000, have facilities, institutions, developments and an enabling environment that attract people to work, invest and stay there.
The private sector must also offer services to support the growing city and its population, among others.
According to Mr Niwagaba, Arua, Mbarara, Gulu and Mbale will be regional cities while others will be strategic cities; Fort Portal (tourism), Jinja (industrial), Lira (industrial) and Hoima (oil).
Nakasongola and Moroto have been differed because their planning requires a different model where basic amenities must be put in place in order to attract dwellers.

Fort Portal tourism city
A fortnight ago, Kabarole District Council approved the proposed Fort Portal tourism city after resolving to annex other lower administrative units as it gears up for the long awaited city status.
Parts of the district annexed to the proposed tourism city include Karago Town Council and Ibaale Parish from Busoro and Karambi sub-counties.

Others include Kiko, Mugusu and Kasenda town councils and Kasenda, Ruteete, Mugusu and Karagura sub-counties. These are endowed with tourism sites such as crater lakes.
The proposed city will have two divisions; one will cover the present East and South divisions, Ibaale Parish, Rubigo Parish and Karambi Sub-county, while the other will cover the present West Division, Karago Town Council, Bukuuku Sub-county and Butebe Parish.
Currently, Fort Portal has West, East and South divisions, covering about 40 square kilometers against the required 120 square kilometers, according to the mayor, the Rev Kintu Muhanga. The 2014 national census put the town population at 54,275.

The urban authority in 2016 launched a campaign of planting one million trees with the aim of creating a forest city by 2025.

 

Credit: Daily Monitor

Published in Ayurveda

Kampala. Following a growth in dividends by five times for 2018 to Shs40 per share from 2017’s Shs7.6 per share, foreign institutional investors are buying Umeme shares as others opt out. 
The Umeme counter has grossed Shs8.68b in the past three days from a sale of 28 million shares. 
This has been a generally rare occurrence on the Uganda Securities Exchange given the volume and amounts involved.
According to an industry source who asked not to be quoted because they are not authorised to speak officially on the matter, the trend is driven by institutional investors.

“These are institutional investors,” he said, adding: “The ones that are selling have held the Umeme shares for a while and at this point they have nothing to lose as the share price itself is not bad.”
For those who are buying the aggregated 28 million shares bought in the past three days would fetch a dividend of more than Shs1.12b, which is worth the investment in that short time.

In 2017, regulatory requirement chopped off Shs115b off its profits to close that year with only Shs35b. 
In 2018 the company almost quadrupled its profits at Shs132b thus the accruing dividend. 
Umeme has been recording some good growth, especially in customer numbers which have grown to 1.3 million customers as of close of December 2018.

The shift to prepaid metering for most of its customers has greatly improved Umeme’s revenue streams. 
However, the company still faces challenges such as collecting outstanding debts from government, where arrears of power bills are increasingly becoming exorbitant. 
In the last six months, Umeme connected at least some 46 new industrial customers that have greatly boosted its numbers.

Source: Daily Monitor

Published in Market

When a smattering of leaders gather this weekend in Kigali to mark the 25th anniversary of Rwanda's genocide there will be one conspicuous absence: French President Emmanuel Macron.
Several African leaders and Belgian Prime Minister Charles Michel are expected at events commemorating the 1994 massacre of an estimated 800,000 Rwandans, mostly minority Tutsis slayed in a dark chapter of Africa's post-colonial history.

Macron too was invited, a move which had been hailed as sign of a fresh start in relations after two decades of turmoil over Rwanda's claims that France was complicit in the genocide.
Forty-one-year-old Macron has presented himself as the face of a new generation of French politician unburdened by the country's murky past in Africa.
But he turned down the invitation from President Paul Kagame, disappointing those hoping for a grand gesture of reconciliation on the French side.
"He did not have the courage to see the process through," Francois Gaulme, researcher at the French Institute of International Relations (IFRI) told AFP.

The Survie NGO members shows banners reading "1994 Genocide of Tutsis in Rwanda, French complicity, denial, lies and impunity, until when ?" and "Hubert Vedrine, expert in dissimulating Genocide complicity" in front of the office of former French foreign minister Hubert Vedrine in Paris on April 4, 2019 as the NGO releases "Lies and silences of France in Rwanda" report. 


 

Source: The Daily Monitor

Published in Politics